Continuous Marketing Increases Patient Enrollment

August 2

Contacting Patients shortly before an in office appoint is an effective way to increase enrollment in remote patient monitoring program

Our client practices who utilized our Patient Mailing and Enrollment Services during 2021 and early 2022 have had great success. This omnichannel program is designed to get as many of the practices eligible patients enrolled in the program as quickly as possible. With this program, we were able to enroll approximately 25% of all eligible patients in a single campaign. The campaign included direct mail (branded for the provider) , text, e-mail, and live-agent phone calls.

25%
Patient Subscriptions in First 30 Days

Method Of Contact and Result

Percent of Patients Receiving Content

Direct Mail

100%

Text Or Email

86%

Patient Called and Reached

55%

Patients Declining Enrollment

10%

Patients Wanting To Confer With Physical

15%

Patients Enrolling In Service

25%

Continuous Marketing builds on this success by contacting patients again 14-21 days before their next appointment.

In April 2022, we piloted Continuous Marketing with one of our client practices. We send a second mailing to patients who had not enrolled in the initial enrollment campaign but were coming into the office in the next 14-21 days. Patients who had already declined enrollment were also removed from the mailing.


From this group, another 25% enrolled in the program.
With a 25% enrolment rate from every mailing, Continuous Marketing is recommended for all our practices clients. RCP will set this up and pay for the all expenses associated with Continuous Marketing.


Talk to your Account Executive or Business Analyst to set up Continuous Marketing for your practices. It will then automatically run each week.


Tags

Product Annoucement, Remote Patient Monitoring, Video SmartHub


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